How Periodontists Can Work with General Dentists (Not Against Them!)

Periodontists and general dentists share a common goal: to provide patients with effective dental treatment. 

Though methodologies and approaches are different for each party, they share a common clientele that often requires the services of both. 

However, many dentists prefer to treat periodontal patients in-house rather than referring out. That can make it seem as though the two are battling for business rather than working toward a common goal. 

Being the specialist, Periodontists are in a better position to show how they can work with dentists rather than against them.

Emphasizing Everyone’s Best Interest

The most important thing you can do when working with dentists is to stress the importance of working for the patient's overall health, not just the practice or specialty.  It’s easy to say we care about the patient’s best interest and this is why we approach the care the way we do. It’s a universal understanding.  But the...

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4 Things Periodontist's Must Do to Earn More Referrals

Referrals are the lifeblood of periodontal practices.  We recently talked about practical ways to build relationships with general dentists to earn referral business, starting with the importance of establishing trust. 

Making a referral isn’t a decision dentist's and doctor's take lightly.  Their own reputation is on the line, and referrals often serve as an extension of their own practice. 

Explore these four things periodontists can offer dentists and physicians to build trust and strengthen your referral business:

An Under-Promise and Over-Delivery Mentality

Even with good intentions, periodontists shouldn’t make claims they can’t fully guarantee. When speaking about your practice or how you handle referred patients, it’s always better to under promise and over deliver in order to build faith and maintain trust.

Faster Communication and Inclusion in the Treatment Process

Most periodontists spend a full workday drafting correspondence...

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A Practical Guide to Building Relationships with Referring Dentists

Dental patients are dependent on the expertise of their general dentist. Whether dentists refer patients to a periodontal specialist or offer to provide periodontal treatment in-house, patients are likely to comply. 

Because of this high level of trust between general dentists and patients, building relationships with dentists to earn referral power is non-negotiable. 

So what can periodontists do to build a relationship with dentists as powerful as that between dentists and their patients to the point where dentists don’t have to think twice about sending patients to your practice? 

It starts by creating trust and goodwill before discussing any business.

Trust Shouldn’t Be Sacrificed for Profits

Referrals make up a large portion of a periodontal practice’s revenue, but profits should never come before trust. 

Periodontists should build their referral relationships on trust rather than business. By doing so, specialists create sustainable value...

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The Dangers of Dental Implants Without Effective Treatment Planning

Dental implants are becoming a desirable alternative to traditional periodontal treatment. Patients see them as a viable, attractive solution to improve their smiles quickly and dentists can charge high fees. But, do we understand the dangers of dental implants without effective treatment planning?

 

While generally safe and effective, dental implants can be more problematic for certain patients if diagnosis and treatment plans are ignored.

 

As a result, patients are ultimately the ones who suffer from an ineffective dental implants process. It’s largely up to dentists to prevent their negative effects. Below we'll be looking at some of the dangers of a poor dental implants procedure.

Dental Implants in a Compromised Periodontium

As all periodontists already know, dental implants have been hailed as a solution for tooth loss. But patients experiencing tooth loss from periodontal disease may be at greater risk for implant failure if the underlying periodontal...

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Reviewed: The Most Popular Software Products Used by Periodontists

A round-up of four common periodontal software solutions for easy comparison

When it comes to choosing software for your periodontal practice, most practice owners face two choices: opt for a general management software or choose one specifically made for the dental industry. There are countless options for the former given their basic nature, but finding the best solutions for periodontal’s unique needs isn’t so easy. 

For starters, there aren’t nearly as many industry-specific options compared to general practice management. And of the industry solutions that do exist, many of them are more heavily tailored to general dentistry and not periodontal professionals.

 We’ve rounded up four of top software products for periodontal professionals so you can compare their features and make an informed decision for your practice:

Fast Notes App

Fast Notes is a cloud-based app that’s still fairly new in the periodontal community. It’s touted as a...

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PANDA Perio Comparison to Practice Management Software: The Difference Matters

Every periodontal practice uses some form of practice management software to better manage day to day tasks, such as scheduling, invoicing, and accounting. But is it enough to help you run a profitable practice? 

Practice management software excels at providing front-end support to your team, but it fails to meet the needs of the Periodontist when it comes to electronic medical records and charting that can increase efficiency and profitability in the examining room. 

In addition, traditional practice software lacks the ability to easily manage marketing-related tasks to referring practices. Maintaining strong connections with referring practices is critical to your success, but practice management software can strain these relationships by not providing sufficient information. Internal marketing is just as important:  customizing patient education as opposed to canned brochures and hypotheticals can help patients take active involvement in their care. Providers need...

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3 Common Mistakes That Negatively Impact Your Treatment Planning

Even after years of education and expertise, periodontists and their teams can still make mistakes during the treatment planning phase. 

Small mistakes can often lead to bigger ones, which can ultimately affect the outcome of the treatment’s effectiveness. Let’s explore three of the most common errors of perio treatment planning and how you can avoid them.

#1 - Poor Communication with the Referring Doctor

If you rely on general practitioners for referrals, you have an obligation to communicate with each other concerning each patient’s needs. The reality is that many periodontists do not follow up in a timely manner or fail to foster ongoing communication. 

When handoffs are shaky, it creates issues for both you and your patient. Not having the right information can create gaps in treatment planning. In addition, you could risk losing referral business from other doctors and your reputation may take a hit.

#2 - Lack of Detail Regarding the Treatment Plan

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How to Streamline Periodontal Charting

perio charting Oct 05, 2018

If you could change one thing about the periodontal charting process, what would it be?

 

Speed up the data collection and entry process? Customize it to the way you want to work? Simplify the look and feel of charting?

 

We’ve heard a variety of answers to this very question, and they all relate to a key point: periodontal charting isn’t a quick and easy task - and it could be costing you more time, money, and resources than it should.

Why Better Periodontal Charting Is Needed

If you’ve tried to break away from traditional charting in favor of electronic record keeping, you’ve likely noticed that most solutions are made for general dentistry and not for the specialty of periodontics. It’s a major limitation on the data you’re able to collect, view, and analyze, which forces you to pursue other options to capture the details you need.

 

Visual elements play an equally important role in charting, but many traditional solutions...

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How Periodontists Can Prepare Themselves for the 2017 World Workshop Changes on the Classification of Periodontal and Peri-Implant Diseases and Conditions

diagnosis Sep 17, 2018

Are you aware of the new classifications of periodontal and peri-implant diseases and conditions? 

The American Academy for Periodontology recently released several changes to periodontal diagnosis, and these changes will affect the patient services and care you provide.

AAP Changes in Periodontal Disease Diagnosis

The recent update to the classification for peri-implant disease and conditions is a comprehensive effort that periodontists haven’t seen the likes of in almost 20 years.  All of the following have been affected, at least in part, by the recent restructuring: 

  • Acute periodontal conditions
  • Endo-periodontal lesion
  • Necrotizing gingivitis
  • Necrotizing periodontitis
  • Periodontal abscess
  • Periodontal disease
  • Periodontitis
  • Periodontal classification
  • Gingivitis
  • Peri-implant mucositis
  • Peri-implantitis
  • Peri-implant tissues
  • Case definition
  • Hard tissue deficiencies
  • Soft tissue deficiencies

As a result, periodontitis is no longer classified as chronic or...

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The 2 Most Commonly Forgotten Components of Periodontal Diagnosis in the Practice

When you’re exploring diagnoses for a patient, you look for certain things, like probing depth, clinical attachment level, and bleeding on probing. The signs you identify lead you to a periodontal diagnosis, at which point you can explore treatment options. 

But whatever steps you take to reach a diagnosis, there are two key components to the process that are often left unaddressed - and they’re both critical to your success and the eventual outcome for your patients:

#1 - A Systematized Approach to Diagnosis

Despite our growing understanding of periodontal diseases, traditional clinical parameters are largely responsible for an accurate and thorough diagnosis. Only then will you be able to provide the expected level of treatment and care to your patients. 

However, the actual methods for diagnosis can vary between provider, even within the same practice. Many providers lack a systematized way of approaching diagnosis, in part because they can often make...

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